Ixodia achillaeoides in Black Hill, Morialta and Horsnell Gully Conservation Parks

COMPOSITAE

Ixodia achillaeoides
Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill CP 21 Jan 2008

Ixodia achillaeoides
Hills daisy

Firstly, the name Ixoodia comes from the Greek word, ixodes, sticky, a reference to the sticky leaves.

Ixodias are only found in Australia, and we have two species, with Ixodia achillaeoides being the one known to us. This plant is also sometimes known as 'Fireweed' but don't be confused, it is not a weed. Unfortunately, plants are often seen uprooted along the tracks. This practice is not only ill-informed, it is also un-lawful. Don't be confused, these are not weeds!

The name achillaeoides means similar to the genus Achillea - these are the plants known as yarrow.

A small shrub to about 2m tall., the flattened stems are very distinctive, and bright green when all around other plants are browning off. With bright white daisy-like flowers in clusters at the ends of branches in early summer. Flowers about about a half a centimetre across.

Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill Conservation Park
13 December 2008, Ixodia achillaeoides.
Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill Consevation Park
21 January 2008, Ixodia achillaeoides close-up.

Fire response
The primary way Ixodia achillaeoides responds to fire is by regrowing from seed. Most of the seed germinate following a fire disturnbance, and seeds are relatively short lived. Seeds on the plants do not survive being scorched by fire. There is medium confidence that plants will repopulate an area following a fire event. However, all plants will be of the same age, and need sufficient time to reach maturing set and release seed if they are to survive subsequent fire events. There is low confidence that plants will establish in a new area following fire as plants do not compete well with other regenerating species.

Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill Conservation Park
13 December 2008, Ixodia achillaeoides.
Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill Consevation Park
21 January 2008, Ixodia achillaeoides close-up.
Ixodia achillaeoides
Black Hill Consevation Park
30 December 2008, Ixodia achillaeoides close-up.

Return to Black Hill plant page 1

Return to Horsnell Gully plant page 1

Return to Morialta plant page 1

New page added 19 February 2009
Sources: e-Flora of SA, Encyclopeadia of Australian Plants.

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